Surgical Services

We provide many surgical services at our clinic including routine spay and neuters, soft-tissue surgeries and orthopedic surgeries. Occasionally, we refer our patients to specialists (board certified veterinary surgeons) to perform complex operations.

About our Anesthetics

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During general anesthesia, our patients are hooked up to a high tech monitor that continually measures heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygenation level and blood pressure. In turn, this machine is monitored by our registered veterinary technician, Annisa, who also checks capillary refill time. We place your pet on a heated blanket to maintain body temperature, especially important in the very young, the very old and the very thin.

In middle-age and older pets, we strongly recommend intravenous fluids, first to give us an IV access should a critical situation arise and second to support kidney and cardiac function in an older fasted animal. Anesthetic emergencies can occur but with close monitoring most can be prevented before they happen.

Here at Mono Veterinary Clinic our standard general anesthetic protocol includes sedation with a cocktail that varies depending on age, health status and procedure to be done. Sedation is given either intramuscularly, under the skin or intravenously again depending on the desired effects. Induction is usually done with an intravenous injection.

Occasionally we may induce a pet with only a gas anesthetic. After the pet is unconscious, we insert a breathing tube and hook them up to a gas anesthetic machine that delivers oxygen along with the anesthetic agent. This keeps the animal anesthetized safely for as long as the procedure takes. We also hook the pet up to a monitor that measures oxygenation levels, blood pressure and heart rate.

This is the monitor that we use that measures your pet's vitals.

Dentistry

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According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have oral disease by the age of 3. It is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in pets. Common signs of oral disease include tartar buildup, red and swollen gums, bad breath, changes in eating or chewing habits, pawing at the face and generalized depression.

A veterinarian should evaluate your pet’s dental health at least once a year. We recommend this because bacteria and food debris accumulates around a pet’s teeth and, if left unchecked, will lead to deterioration of the soft tissue and bone surrounding the teeth. This decay results in irreversible periodontal disease and even tooth loss.

There are other reasons why you should pay close attention to your pet’s dental health. Dental disease can affect other organs in the body: bacteria in the mouth can get into the blood stream and may cause serious kidney infections, liver disease, lung disease, and heart valve disease. Oral disease can also indicate that another disease process is occurring elsewhere in a pet’s body. A thorough physical exam combined with appropriate laboratory work can determine if this is the case.

We can recommend and demonstrate preventative measures you can begin at home. Our wellness program emphasizes and explains how you can avoid costly dental procedures with your pet in the future.

Spay/Neuters

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Spaying refers to the surgical procedure performed on female dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to spaying your female companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, spaying will eliminate the sometimes ‘messy’ heat cycles that attract male dogs to your house from miles away. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as pyometra (infection in the uterus) and mammary cancer.

paying involves surgical removal of both ovaries and the uterus via an incision in the abdominal wall and therefore requires a general anesthetic. Every pet undergoing general anesthetic is monitored for heart rate, level of oxygenation and blood pressure. Annisa, our registered veterinary technician continually assesses your pet’s vital signs during the procedure. Although the risk of an anesthetic death in a normal healthy pet is very rare, our monitoring devices and procedures allow us to respond to an anesthetic emergency faster. Faster responses can save lives. Please call or visit our facility to learn more about our spaying procedures.

Neutering refers to the surgical procedure performed on male dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to neutering your male companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, neutering will eliminate undesirable and at times, embarrassing behavior in your male companion. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as prostate disease and testicular cancer.

Neutering involves surgical removal of both testicles. It is performed under a general anesthetic. Every pet undergoing general anesthetic is monitored for heart rate, level of oxygenation and blood pressure. Annisa, our registered veterinary technician continually assesses your pet’s vital signs during the procedure. Although the risk of an anesthetic death in a normal healthy pet is very rare, our monitoring devices and procedures allow us to respond to an anesthetic emergency faster. Faster responses can save lives. Please call or visit our facility to learn more about our neutering procedures.

Cleo has been sedated for at least 15 minutes and has been put right out with an intravenous anesthetic agent. Here we are inserting an endotracheal tube to maintain anesthesia.

Cleo is connected to the gas anesthetic machine, the pulse oximeter which measures oxygenation levels has been hooked up and here we are inserting an IV catheter.

Cleo's tummy is being clipped in preparation for the spay procedure. After the hair is clipped, the surgical site will be scrubbed twice with an antiseptic solution.

Cleo has been moved to surgery - EKG and pulse oximeter are hooked up. Blood pressure monitoring will also be started before surgery.

Soft Tissue Surgery

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Soft tissue surgery includes virtually all surgeries not associated with bone. Examples of soft tissue surgeries are listed below.

Probably the most common soft tissue surgery performed at our clinic is the removal of masses or ‘lumps’ on animals. Most of these masses or ‘lumps’, once removed and tested, are benign (non-harmful); however, occasionally they are more serious. Early removal and accurate diagnosis of a ‘lump’ is necessary to improve the outcome in your pet if the mass is cancerous. Lacerations are also common in pets and suturing will reduce the chance of infection, improve healing time and reduce scarring.

Removal of foreign bodies from the gastrointestinal tract, uroliths from the urinary bladder, and porcupine quills from virtually every part of a dog’s body are also common procedures.

Ninety percent of these procedures require a general anesthetic. Every pet undergoing a general anesthetic is monitored for heart rate, level of oxygenation and blood pressure. For our middle- age to older patients and any procedure expected to last longer than 20 minutes, we strongly recommend to have them on intravenous fluids. These pets are fasted from the night before because of the general anesthetic, and some have reduced renal and cardiac function. The use of intravenous fluids supports these pets and promotes rapid recovery from anesthetic.

Orthopedic

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Orthopedic surgery refers to bone and ligament surgery. There are many different situations where bone surgery may be necessary including leg fractures, hip dysplasia, disc disease, cruciate ligament rupture etc. We refer our patients to a Board Certified surgeon to perform most orthopedic procedures.

Anterior cruciate ligament rupture is the most common orthopedic problem presented at our clinic. For most patients a repair can be done here by Dr. Joe Rousseau. For dogs weighing over 75 pounds there is a new procedure to repair this ligament called a TPLO. This procedure actually changes the configuration of the joint thereby giving a more permanent fix. Technically it is much more difficult to do and for that reason is referred to the specialists at www.vetemergency.ca.

Other orthopedic conditions are managed on a case by case basis.